“Sticky Branding” by Jeremy Miller

Principle 3: Function that Resonates

Today I’d like to talk about Principle 3 of Miller’s book “Sticky Branding.” But before I do, here’s a quick recap of the previous Principles.

  • Principle 1 was about clarity and its importance for helping prospective customers in their decision-making process. If you want to refresh your memory, go here.
  • Principle 2 was about consistency in our messaging, which means saying no to opportunities that don’t fit. Here is my take on this principle.

So, let’s move on to Principle 3 and what Miller means by “Function that Resonates.” In a nutshell: products or services of sticky brands must be intuitive, easy to use, and work. And you should strive to always over-deliver and wow your customer. In Miller’s words: “Sticky Brands are positioned to win, because they have a clear understanding of how they deliver value to clients, and they invest in the operational excellence to deliver on those needs.” (page 62)    

The example that resonated with me in this chapter is about a used car dealership called Wheels and Deals. I find that buying a car is no fun. Truth be told, I don’t like it at all. In my many car-driving years I can recall only one occasion where I enjoyed shopping for and buying a car; it was when I was buying my Mini Cooper. For the first time I had the feeling the sales rep actually enjoyed what he was doing and was proud of what he was selling. He gave me the feeling I should get the best and most beautiful Mini ever. Why does this come to my mind right now? That is where Miller’s example comes into play. 

Wheels and Deals, a small local used car dealership, did well until the competitive landscape started changing. A competitor with deep pockets opened their doors nearby. Their bigger inventory attracted a lot of customers, hurting the “little guy,” Wheels and Deals. Instead of sticking his head in the proverbial sand, Jim took the time observing his competitor, noting what they did well and what they didn’t do so well. I’m not surprised by his discovery, because he noticed that their sales reps “…were aggressive, commission driven, and they didn’t care what they sold to their customers.” (page 54) 

This is exactly how I felt so many times when buying a car. Sorry, I digress. Let’s continue with the example. 

Wheels and Deals used Jim’s observations to their advantage. They started focusing on better quality cars and better service. In addition, they communicated and showed their customers how they’ll keep their promise of selling higher-quality cars. 

Here is what they started doing for higher quality: Each car they purchased for resale was inspected and serviced beyond government regulations. Before they put a car on the sales lot, they “invest, on average, between $800 and $1,200 in every car.” (page 54) It means making less money on each sold car, but making up for it in volume and customer loyalty. This customer loyalty wasn’t built overnight. It took time. They didn’t only speak of higher quality cars and better service, they lived and breathed it and earned their customers’ trust. 

And here is how they welcome new customers: Friendly staff greets them in a beautiful showroom, they get a tour of the dealership which includes a visit at the mechanics’ bays, and an introduction to the Customer Care Manager. And to top that, Wheels and Deals gives a 90-day warranty with each car. I’m sure their customers don’t think the sales rep is pushy or doesn’t care. On the contrary, by taking the time and showing their customers around they demonstrate what their customers can expect. Did I mention the word trust?

I can only attest to how important both customer service and genuine caring are for someone who is purchasing a car. It proves that “Even commoditized markets can stand out and create Function that Resonates” with their customers. (page 53) Having said that, only a company’s core skills and assets can sustain this competitive edge and make it an integral part of their value proposition. 

  • Finally, and a quick flashback to Principle 1, I quote: “The customer is working with an organization that delivers a tangible benefit, and they can see it, talk about it, and experience it.” (page 56) 

COVID 19 has changed our business landscape to an extent that I can’t fathom yet. I’m very impressed by some entrepreneurs’ and solopreneurs’ creativity and their ideas on how to provide value to their customers and keep their businesses running. I met them in virtual networking groups. We were and still are trying to help each other through brainstorming. Here are some of the examples:

  • A swim teacher creates online birthday parties for children 
  • A photographer offers an online photo shoot 
  • A realtor provides additional information relevant to people buying a house or moving 
  • Yoga studios and gyms teach online classes

To me the “Function that Resonates” or customer value is obvious. All of the above offerings are a product of today’s shelter in place situation helping people celebrate children’s birthdays, getting their exercise, or keeping in touch with their prospective clients by providing helpful information pertaining to buying a house or moving.

I believe I mentioned it in the introduction to this series, building a sticky brand isn’t for the faint of heart. It takes time, adaptability, creativity, an open ear for your customers, a lot of work, and a long-term commitment. But looking at the current situation proves to me that it is the only way, especially for small businesses, to survive. 

 “When you identify an area that can make a real impact on your clients, hold on to it. Invest in it. Make it your own.” (page 62)

And with that I would love to hear what you think about Principle 3. What is your take on it? Put your thoughts in the comments below. 

See you next week,
Regine

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